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30
Jul

Management options of Bacterial Leaf Streak of Rice

i. Varietal Resistance Grow resistant varieties like Bala, Padma, Sabarmati and moderately resistant varieties like Krishna, Jamuna etc. Use certified seeds from the reliable sources. ii. Cultural practices  The disease can be controlled by proper application of fertilizers and proper planting spacing.  Practicing field sanitation is important. Ratoons, straws and volunteer seedlings left after harvest can be destroyed to minimize the initial inoculum at the beginning of the season.
30
Jul

Host range of Bacterial Leaf Streak of Rice

Species of wild rice such as Oryza spontanea, O. perennis balunga, O. nivara, O. breviligulata, O. glaberrima, and Leersia hexandra Sw. (southern cutgrass) are alternate hosts of the disease.
The bacteria causing the disease X. oryzae pv.oryzicola occur as rods. They are 1.2 x 0.3-0.5 µm in dimension. They are single, occasionally in pairs but not in chains. The bacteria have no spores and no capsules. They move with the aid of a single polar flagellum. They are Gram-negative and aerobic and can grow favourably at 28 °C. The bacterial colonies on nutrient agar are pale yellow, circular, smooth, convex, and viscid and have an entire margin. Their growth on slant is filiform. Growth
30
Jul

Symptoms of Bacterial Leaf Streak of Rice

• Initially, small, dark-green and water-soaked streaks on interveins from tillering to booting stage. • Streaks dark-green at first and later enlarge to become yellowish gray and translucent. • Numerous small yellow beads of bacterial exudates on surface of lesions on humid conditions. • Very small yellow beads instead of bacterial exudates during dry season. • Lesions turn brown to gre
30
Jul

Economic importance of Bacterial Leaf Streak of Rice

1. Under favourable weather conditions particularly typhoons and rain storms, the disease spread through entire fields, all the upper leaves become infected and turn brown resulting in heavy damage. 2. Losses as high as 32.3% in 1000-grain weight due to BLS were reported. At three disease intensities, the estimated yield losses were 8.3%, 13.5%, and 17.1% in the wet season and 1.5%, 5.9%, and 2.5% during the dry season.
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