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EIS

23
Jun

National Institute of Agricultural Marketing (NIAM)

 

National Institute of Agricultural Marketing (NIAM)

Title: National Institute of Agricultural Marketing (NIAM)

Type:  Central Sector Scheme   

Objectives:  

Related Terms: EISGovernment Schemes
23
Jun

Environmental factors Influencing Weed Competition

 1. Depending on the rice variety used, competition for light appears to intensify as the weeds grow taller than the rice crop. With decreased light transmission ratio in dry seeded rice. 

2. Grassy weeds and sedges become more competitive for solar energy than broad leaved  weeds, while in wet-seeded rice, the competitive effect of Echinochloa on tillering of rice is  the main factor in reducing the yield.  

 

File Courtesy: 
Weed Management in Rice, DRR Training Manual
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

Agricultural Marketing Information Network

 

                                                            Agricultural Marketing Information Network

Title: Agricultural Marketing Information Network   

Type: Central Sector Scheme   

Related Terms: EISGovernment Schemes
23
Jun

Soil factors Influencing Weed Competition

 1. Many soil factors modify weed competition, while soil nutrient status, influences the nature and duration of competition in dry seeded rice. 

2. Usually, weeds grow better under adequate levels of nutrients, thus making them more competitive, indicating that weed control becomes more important with increase in fertilizer application.

 

File Courtesy: 
Weed Management in Rice, DRR Training Manual
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

Factors Influencing Weed Competition

 

 1. The competition between crops and weeds is mainly through the capture and utilization of resources and depends on time of germination, rate of growth of the plants and the spatial arrangement of their  foliage and roots.

2.  Limiting resources during the reproductive phase may also negatively impact yield but, more typically  reduces grain quality and yield stability. 

File Courtesy: 
Weed Management in Rice, DRR Training Manual
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

Why is the type of weed important?

 

Ability to identify the weeds is important, as it helps determine the expected level of the damages and problems caused by the weeds vary in the extent to which they can reduce yield and or quality.

1. Tells extent of potential yield loss e.g., weedy rice 70% loss, Sesbania 19% loss.

2. The type of weed can also tell you about the field and its management.  For      

    example,  the presence of Ipomoea aquatica indicates prolonged water logging,  

File Courtesy: 
www.knowledgebank.irri.org
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

Weed flora associated with different systems of rice culture

 

The major weeds of rice fall into three categories: 

1. Broad leaved weeds - characterized by broad leaves with a network of veins.

2. Grasses: characterized by long narrow leaves, parallel veins, a hollow stem and leaves aligned in two rows on the stem.

 3. Sedges: characterized by three rows of leaves on the stem and a solid, triangular stem. 

 

File Courtesy: 
Weed Management in Rice, DRR Training Manual
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

Losses due to weeds

 1.  Weeds compete with the rice plants for nutrients, moisture, sunlight and space, causing a quantitative reduction in the potential yield of rice. 

2.  With increase in adoption of modern cultivars, the high fertility conditions coupled with slow growth rate of high yielding dwarf varieties are conducive for rapid growth and proliferation of weeds. 

3.  In different systems of rice culture, very often the yield losses due to weeds exceed those of the diseases and insect pests. 

File Courtesy: 
Weed Management in Rice, DRR Training Manual
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

why weeds are successful

 The weeds become successful because of their characteristics that give them the ability to: 

1.weeds has very high output of seeds and set seed before the main crop ripens.Most of the weeds especially annuals produce enormous quantity of seeds. 

2. It has been observed that among 61 perennial weeds, the average seed-production capacity was 26,500 per plant.

3. Weeds have the capacity to withstand adverse conditions in the field, because they can modify their seed production and growth according to the availability of moisture and temperature.

File Courtesy: 
Weed Management in Rice, DRR Training Manual
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

Why do weeds cause problems?

 1. Weeds are an important factor in the management of all land and water resources, but their effect is greatest on agriculture. The losses caused by weeds exceed the losses caused by any other category of agricultural pests. 

File Courtesy: 
http://agritech.tnau.ac.in/agriculture /agri_weedmgt_aboutweed.html
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

What is a weed?

                  
  • Weeds are plants in out of place. They are unwanted and undesirable, because they interfere with utilisation of land, sunlight, nutrition and water resources and thus adversely affect the crop yield. 

 

File Courtesy: 
Weed Management in Rice, DRR Training Manual
Photo Courtesy: 
Dr.Sridevi (DRR)
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

Why weed management is important?

  •  Unwanted and undesirable plants interfere or compete with rice crop in the utilisation of resources like land, sunlight, nutrients and water and thus adversely affect the rice crop yield.
  • Weeds compete with beneficial and desired vegetation, reducing the yield and quality of rice crop.
  • High fertility conditions coupled with slow growth rate of high yielding dwarf rice varieties are conducive for rapid growth and proliferation of weeds.

 

File Courtesy: 
Weed Management in Rice, DRR Training Manual
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
23
Jun

Principles of weed management in rice

 The basic principles in weed management: 

1. Manipulation of the habitat is done by utilizing some biological differences between the crop and the weeds.

 2. Making of the crop in competitive advantage over the weeds;

 3. Control measures are taken to reduce the survival mechanisms of the weeds in the soil.

 4. Crop production techniques must not allow the establishment of stable community of perennials which are difficult to control;

File Courtesy: 
Weed Management in Rice, DRR Training Manual
Photo Courtesy: 
Dr.R.M. Kumar (DRR)
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
22
Jun

Suitable Season for Hybrid Rice Cultivation

1. Rice hybrids can be grown both in kharif as well as rabi seasons.
2. The long duration hybrids should not be cultivated during rabi season and even for medium duration hybrids.
3. Care should be taken to see that plantings are not delayed, otherwise the flowering may coincide with high temperatures in April/May, thus adversely affecting yields.

File Courtesy: 
Agro Techniques for Hybrid Rice Cultivation and Seed Production - 2005, DRR Training Manual
9
Jun

Growing improved varieties of paddy

Profile of the Farmer

Related Terms: EISFarmers Innovation
9
Jun

Overcoming cyclonic loss by growing paddy variety RGL-2537

Profile of the Farmer

Related Terms: EISFarmers Innovation
9
Jun

Ecofrienldly and sustainable agro technique for Low land rice Cultivation.

 

Profile of the Farmer

 

Related Terms: EISFarmers Innovation
8
Jun

Paddy as inter crop in sugarcane

Profile of the Farmer: 

Related Terms: EISFarmers Innovation
8
Jun

Weed control

 

1. Spray 2, 4-D sodium salt 80 W.P. @ 2.5kg per /ha in 750 liters of water, 3-4 weeks after transplanting. Dicot weeds and some annual grasses and sedges to some extent are controlled. Avoid spray drift reaching to other susceptible crops such as cotton, grapes, peas, beans, potato and other cucurbits in the vicinity.

Or

File Courtesy: 
ZARS Mandya
Related Terms: EISWeed Management
8
Jun

Nursery Management

 

Two types of nurseries are present

1.Dry nursery.

2. Wet nursery.

 

 

File Courtesy: 
ZARS Mandya
Photo Courtesy: 
Dr.RM Kumar (DRR)
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