Best Viewed in Mozilla Firefox, Google Chrome

Insects

Insects
7
Feb

Control of moths in stored grains

The Angoumois grain moth is the most serious pest injurious to rice, both in the field and storage.

This moth also attacks other cereals like maize, wheat and sorghum.

The infestation may reach serious levels before the grains are transported to the storage godowns resulting in around 25 per cent loss in weight and seed viability.

Internal pest

The larva is an internal borer of the whole grain, feeding on the starchy part. Severely infested material emits an unpleasant smell and looks unhealthy in appearance.

Grains are often covered with scales shed by the moths. The grains are practically hollow and filled with larval excreta and other refuse making it unfit for consumption.

The adult is a small, straw coloured moth. The female can lay an average of 150 eggs on unhusked paddy grains.

They hatch in a week’s period. Newly hatched caterpillar is yellowish white in colour with a brown head capsule. It soon bores into the grain and feeds on its contents.

Larval stage lasts for about three weeks. Before pupation, the larva constructs a silken cocoon in the cavity made during feeding and turns into reddish brown pupa.

After a period of 4-7 days, the adult emerges. Entire life cycle is completed in 30-35 days.

Several generations are completed in a year. Adults are short-lived and can be seen flying about in large numbers in storage bags and on the surface of grains.

Management

— Drying the grains under sun for three days to reduce moisture content below 12 per cent is suggested.

— The jute bags to be used for storing grains have to be dipped in insecticidal solution of fenitrothion 50EC at 5ml/20 liters of water.

— Application of dichlorvos (DDVP) 76SC is recommended on the surface of stored jute bags by dissolving 7ml/lit. of water and the spray solution is sprayed at three lit/100 sq.m.

— Male moths can also be caught in sticky traps baited with female sex pheromone.

Reference :

(J. Jayaraj, Prof and R.K. Murali Baskaran, Professor and Head, Dept. of Agriculture Entomology, Agricultural College and Research Institute, Tamil Nadu Agricultural University, Madurai 625 104, email: muralibaskaran2007@rediffmail.com, mobile: 9655677669.)

File Courtesy: 
http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/agriculture/control-of-moths-in-stored-grains/article4386889.ece
15
May

Pink stem borer (PSB)

Pink stem borer (PSB), Sesamia inferens (Walker)

File Courtesy: 
DRR Technical Bulletin No. 59/2011, Rice stem borers in India: species composition and distribution
15
May

Gold fringed borer

Gold fringed borer (GFB), Chilo auricilius (Dudgeon)

File Courtesy: 
DRR Technical Bulletin No. 59/2011, Rice stem borers in India: species composition and distribution
15
May

Dark headed borer

Dark headed borer (DHB), Chilo poly chrysus(Meyrick)

File Courtesy: 
DRR Technical Bulletin No. 59/2011, Rice stem borers in India: species composition and distribution
15
May

Striped stem borer

Striped stem borer (SSB), Chilo suppressalis (Walker)

File Courtesy: 
DRR Technical Bulletin No. 59/2011, Rice stem borers in India: species composition and distribution
14
May

White stem borer

 1.   White stem borer (WSB)

There is no clarity regarding the taxonomic identity of the white stem borer species reported on rice in India. Two species reported in the literature relevant to rice are described below:
 
a.

File Courtesy: 
DRR Technical Bulletin No. 59/2011, Rice stem borers in India: species composition and distribution
14
May

Yellow stem borer

Yellow stem borer (YSB), Scirpophaga incertulas (Walker)

 
Distribution: This species is prevalent in many states across the country.

File Courtesy: 
DRR Technical Bulletin No. 59/2011, Rice stem borers in India: species composition and distribution
25
Jul

Bioecology of Green- horned caterpillar

Bioecology of Green- horned caterpillar  

  • The green horned caterpillars adults are large butterflies and are easily recognized because of the pattern of eye spots on their wings.
  • Larvae are yellow-green and have two pairs of horns on the flat and square head and posterior end of the body.
  • The body is covered with small and yellow bead-like hairs. Melanitis has white or black horns and Mycalesis has red horns.
File Courtesy: 
Field management of insect pests of rice - A ready reckoner. Technical Bulletin No.46, Directorate of Rice Research, Rajendranagar
Photo Courtesy: 
Mr.Y.Kondal Rao (DRR)
25
Jul

Taxonomy of Green- horned caterpillar

Taxonomy of Green- horned caterpillar

Class: Insecta

Order: Lepidoptera

Family : Satyridae

Genus : Melanitis

Species : leda ismene

File Courtesy: 
Field management of insect pests of rice - A ready reckoner. Technical Bulletin No.46, Directorate of Rice Research, Rajendranagar
Photo Courtesy: 
Dr.Chitra Shanker
25
Jul

Insect pests of minor significance

Insect pests of minor significance

The insect pests of minor significance are as follows:

1. Green- horned caterpillar

2. Rice skipper

3. Green semilooper

4. Grass hoppers

5. Whorl maggot

File Courtesy: 
Field management of insect pests of rice - A ready reckoner. Technical Bulletin No.46, Directorate of Rice Research, Rajendranagar
25
Jul

Management of Cut worm

Management of Cut worm

Cultural control: Keeping fields flooded may keep population of this pest at low levels.

Biological control: Biological control agents of cutworm are very abundant. For example, scelionid and braconid wasps are egg parasitoids and grasshoppers are predators of the pest. Fungal and polyhedrosis viruses are pathogens that attack this insect pest.

File Courtesy: 
Insect Pests of Rice by M. D. Pathak and Z. R. Khan
25
Jul

Nature of Damage of Cut worm

Nature of Damage of Cut worm  

File Courtesy: 
Insect Pests of Rice by M. D. Pathak and Z. R. Khan
25
Jul

Host Range of Cut worm

Host Range of Cut worm

Climbing cutworm is a polyphagous insect and has been recorded as a serious pest of Rice, Wheat, Oats, Barley, and other cereals and also infests grassy weeds, while the common cutworm is reported on Lettuce, Cabbage, Beetroot, Peanuts, Geranium, Cotton, Banana, Sorghum, Sugarcane, Tomatoes, Asparagus, Apple and Eggplant.

File Courtesy: 
Insect Pests of Rice by M. D. Pathak and Z. R. Khan
25
Jul

Bioecology of cut worm

Bioecology of cut worm

Mythimna seperata (Climbing cut worm):

File Courtesy: 
Insect Pests of Rice by M. D. Pathak and Z. R. Khan
Photo Courtesy: 
CRRI
25
Jul

Taxonomy of Cut worm

Taxonomy of Cut worm

Order: Lepidoptera

Family: Noctuidae

Genus: Spodoptera

Species: litura

Genus: Mythimna

Species: seperata

File Courtesy: 
Insect Pests of Rice by M. D. Pathak and Z. R. Khan
Photo Courtesy: 
Dr.Chitra Shanker
25
Jul

Chemical control of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

Chemical control of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

1. Chemical control may be needed when populations are extremely high.

2. The dosage should be adjusted based on the average size of the larvae.

3. Spraying should be done in the late afternoon just before the larvae climb up for feeding.

4. The damage is generally patchy and hence spray can be directed mostly on affected regions

File Courtesy: 
Insect Pests of Rice by M. D. Pathak and Z. R. Khan
Photo Courtesy: 
Mr.M.Mohan
25
Jul

Biological control of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

Biological control of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

Armyworms are held in check by egg and larval parasites. When these parasites fail, usually because of drought, armyworms become epidemic

1. Parasitoids such as Trichogrammatids, Scelionids, tachinids, ichneumonids, eulophids, chalcids, and braconid wasps parasitize this pest.

2. Ants, birds and toads feed on the pest. Fungal diseases and a nuclear polyhedrosis virus also infect the larvae.

File Courtesy: 
Insect Pests of Rice by M. D. Pathak and Z. R. Khan
Photo Courtesy: 
Mr.M.Mohan
25
Jul

Nature of Damage of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

Nature Of Damage of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

The swarming caterpillars cause severe damage to rice plants in nursery beds. They appear suddenly in masses and move like an army from field to field so that seedbeds or the direct seeded fields look as if grazed by cattle

1. This is a sporadic pest but causes very serious damage to young crops when it appears in large number.

File Courtesy: 
Field management of insect pests of rice - A ready reckoner. Technical Bulletin No.46, Directorate of Rice Research, Rajendranagar
Photo Courtesy: 
Gajendran, G. Prof.&Head (Crop Protection), Trichy
25
Jul

Host Range and Host Plant Resistance of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

Host Range of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

  • Rice,
  • Maize,
  • Jowar,
  • Wheat,
  • Barley,
  • Sugarcane and
  • a variety of grasses

Host plant resistance to Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

  • Several wild rices and a few plant introductions (PI) possess moderate levels of resistance to Spodoptera mauritia
File Courtesy: 
Insect Pests of Rice by M. D. Pathak and Z. R. Khan
25
Jul

Bioecology of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

Bioecology of Armyworm/Swarming caterpillar

1. Eggs are laid in masses on leaves and covered with grey hairs.

2. The egg period is 7 days. Caterpillar is cylindrical dark to pale green with lateral lines along the body.

3. The larval period is 20-25 days. It pupates in an earthern cocoon in soil for 10-15 days.

File Courtesy: 
Insect Pests of Rice by M. D. Pathak and Z. R. Khan
Photo Courtesy: 
Mr.Y.Kondal Rao (DRR)
Syndicate content
Copy rights | Disclaimer | RKMP Policies